To have ants in your pants

To have ants in your pants!  –  Tener hormigas en los pantalones

ants-in-pantsWhat does this idiom mean? ‘To be super, super, super excited’

Ok, I serioulsy have ants in my pants.  My friends are flying into Málaga and we have a rock ‘n’ roll getaway planned: there will be cycling,  rock climbing, jacuzzi, hip wiggling to live music and definitely a lot of eating and drinking and perhaps some falling over. And, luckily for me, none of my friends are keen on shopping or cooking.  So, what’s in my suitcase?  Credit card, aspirin, aspirin, aspirin, vitamins and a bottle of wine for the journey.  Perfect, I’m in 7th  heaven!

To be on the wagon

To be on the wagon!  –  Estar en el vagón

to be on the wagonWhat does this idiom mean? ‘To stop drinking alcohol for a period of time’

I know!!! I understand the individual words, but not what they mean all together! Now, where is my corkscrew? And, where can I find a wagon like the wagon in the photo?

To be on cloud 9

To be on cloud 9  – Estar en la nube 9

be on cloud 9What does this idiom mean? ‘To feel joy and happiness’

Ok, the summer of 2014 wasn’t great for me: Spain and England were dumped out of the World Cup; my best friend moved out of Málaga and George Clooney got married. Yes, personally speaking, the summer of 2014 was a complete disaster.

However, I’m now feeling all ‘loved-up’ and joyful.  Yep, I’m on cloud 9!  Although, the cherry on the cake is that I have got one of these tickets.Carmina Burana Carmina Burana is simply one of the best choral pieces you will ever hear, and even if you think classical music is as dull as dishwater, I am sure you would enjoy this. You can not help feeling amazed by the sheer brilliance of the human voice!  In my book, choirs ‘rock the house’!

To be as cheap as chips

To be as cheap as chips!  –  A ser tan barato como patatas fritas

cheap as chipsWhat does this idiom mean? ‘To be very, very, very cheap’

Thank God, wine is as cheap as chips in Spain!

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Janette says: Happy Festive Holiday!!

Merry Christmas Ingles Malaga

To break someone’s balls

To break my balls!  –  Romper los huevos

stop ballsWhat does this idiom mean? ‘That someone is annoying another person by constantly criticizing, scolding or nagging them’

Truth be told this is what I have heard for the last 15 years:

”Janette when are you going to:

  1. Come home?
  2. Settle down?
  3. Introduce me to a special friend?
  4. Use a hairbrush?
  5. Use a bit of makeup?
  6. Wear a dress, a skirt, or anything other than trainers and a tracksuit?
  7. Learn how to cook?
  8. Stop messing about?
  9. Blah, blah, blah

So, it is safe to say, if I had balls, I would have been castrated years ago!  And no, unfortunately,  I’m not pulling your leg. My own flesh and blood, my mother, thinks I’m pathetic.

 

To be sick to the back teeth

To be sick to the back teeth!  –  Estar enfermo para los dientes posteriores

sick to the back teethWhat does this idiom mean? ‘A person is annoyed or angry about a situation or the behaviour of a person’

At the moment, I’m sick to the back teeth of rubbish buskers, being woken up at 3 am and junk mail in my postbox! What are you sick to the back teeth of?

To spill the beans

To spill the beans!  –  A soltar la sopa

Spill the beans plainWhat does this idiom mean? ‘To reveal a secret or to tell the truth’

So, if you are a chatterbox, like my 9 year old nephew, you will find it difficult not to spill the beans.

So, the last thing my nephew said to me was: ”Aunty Netty, Mummy says you don’t have a boyfriend because you’ve got dirty socks.  But I think it’s because you can’t run fast enough. 

Well, I think Mummy shouldn’t be talking about my sex life, and for that matter, what have socks got to do with it?   I don’t get it!!!!  Do you?

It’s raining cats and dogs

It’s raining cats and dogs!  –  Está lloviendo gatos y peros

cats and dogsWhat does this idiom mean? ‘It is raining a lot!’

If you visit the UK never, ever forget to take an umbrella.  An umbrella is by far the most important item you will need in your suitcase.

To get on like a house on fire

To get on like a house on fire!  –  Subirse como una casa en el fuego

Janette drinking wineWhat does this idiom mean? ‘To have a great relationship with someone, i.e. you get on really well with them.

My best friend and I are like chalk and cheese.  He’s from Australia and I’m from the UK. He’s a fashion victim and into positive thinking.  I’m a fashion killer and I’m into drinking wine and taking medication!  However, we get on like a house on fire.